Prof. Joe Duffy

Prof. Joe Duffy

Adjunct Professor in the School of Medicine at University College Dublin Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin and UCD Clinical Research Centre, St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

Professor Joe Duffy has a long, established career in clinical biochemistry practice and cancer research.

After graduating from NUI, Galway and earning a PhD at the University of Manchester, he went on to become a Post Doctorate Fellow in Trinity College Dublin. He is now adjunct Professor in the School of Medicine at University College Dublin, having previously worked as Principal biochemist at St Vincents University Hospital. Professor Duffy has an international reputation for his work on cancer biomarkers.

He has published in excess of 250 papers on this topic, including articles in high impact journals such as Lancet, BMJ, J Natl Cancer Instit, Cancer Res, Clin Cancer Res, Ann Oncol and Clin Chem.

His work has been cited > 16,000 times and his current h-index is 71.One of his main contributions has been the development of a test for identifying patients with breast cancer who may not need chemotherapy.

This test, which involves measurement of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) marker, is now recommended for clinical use by several expert groups including the American Society of Clinical Oncology. In 2012, Professor Duffy was the recipient of the 2012 Abbott Award of the International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM).

This award is made annually to investigators who have made an outstanding contribution in the field of basic or clinical oncology.Other awards received by Professor Duffy include the St Luke’s Medal Lecture, the Conway Review Medal Lecture and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland and the National Committee for Biochemistry Award Medal Lecture of the Royal Irish Academy.

 

ABSTRACT

Title: Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Breast Cancer: From Laboratory Research to Clinical Trials

Summary: Major progress has been made in the treatment of breast cancer is recent years as evidenced by the declining mortality rates in most Western countries. Two main factors are
responsible for this decrease in mortality, i.e., mammography screening and improved systemic treatments.

Despite this progress, several challenges exist in the treatment of this disease. Amongst these challenges are: (i) how to deescalate adjuvant therapy in patients with early breast cancer and (ii) lack of a targeted therapy for patients with an aggressive form of the disease known as triple-negative breast cancer.

This lecture will discuss how the author’s research has addressed these 2 challenges.

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Late Breaking Abstracts in Now OPEN!

Biomedical Session Abstracts

Deadline: Midnight, Friday, 20th January 2023

Please note:
- Patrick Johnston Lay submission category is now closed
- Late Breaking Abstracts submitted to the Biomedical Sessions will be considered for Display Poster Presentation. 

Social Nursing and Allied Health (SNAH) Abstracts

Deadline: Midnight, Monday, 9th January 2023

SNAH abstract submissions will remain open until Monday 9th January.

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